Welcome to our Website

The Historic Preservation Trust of Berks County is a diverse group of individuals united in a quest to acquire, preserve, and maintain historically and architecturally significant properties in Berks County, Pennsylvania.

The Trust seeks to foster community involvement and support in promoting awareness and appreciation for the role these sites played in our American history.

Our Historic Properties

Over a period of 40 years, The Historic Preservation Trust of Berks County has pursued its mission of preserving some of the most significant historic buildings in Berks County, Pennsylvania.

Since its inception in 1964, the Historic Preservation Trust of Berks County has acquired numerous architecturally and historically significant properties in the Greater Reading-Berks County Area. The Trust currently maintains eight stone structures from the from the early settlement years of the region, including the oldest documented building still standing in Berks County; the Mouns Jones House.

Morlatton Village – represents pieces of an early Swedish Settlement begun in the early 1700’s, and is considered the birthplace of Berks County. Additional structures constructed slightly later in the 1760’s also comprise the village. This site includes the The Covered Bridge Keepers House, the Mouns Jones house, the Douglass Mansion, and the White Horse Inn.

Michael Fulp House (circa 1780 or 1830) – Located adjacent to the Mouns Jones House, the Covered Bridge Keepers House served as the residence of the primary caretaker of the Douglassville Covered Bridge. The HPTBC began restoring the property in 1965 and significant restoration challenges still exist to this day.

George Douglass Mansion (circa 1763) – Originally built and inhabited by colonial entrepreneur George Douglass, the mansion remains an impressive example of Georgian architecture. The Trust acquired the building in 1988 and began restoration, which is ongoing to this day. Douglassville, PA, home to Morlatton Village, was named after George Douglass.

Mouns Jones House (circa 1716) – Built by early Swedish settler Mouns Jones and his family, the house is the oldest document dwelling in Berks County. The HPTBC began restoration of the property in 1965. The Mouns Jones House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

white-horse-innWhite Horse Inn (circa 1762) –Purchased by the HPTBC in 1970, the White Horse Inn was visited by former President George Washington during Colonial times. The White Horse has undergone extensive restoration throughout the years, but still holds its Colonial Character. The White Horse Inn is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Hottenstein House – Located just outside Kutztown, PA, the main house was built in 1783 by David and Catherine Hottenstein. The house is an outstanding example of German style detailing added to a standard Georgian floor plan. The house remained in the Hottenstein Family until 1976 when it was donated to the HPTBC. The Hottenstein House in listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Johan DeTurk Cabin – The DeTurk Cabin has been recognized by the U.S. Government as “an important architectural survivor from the Colonial Period” and is documented in the Library of Congress. The HPTBC acquired the property in 1967, and holds a 100 year lease on the property.

KeimJacob Keim Farmstead – Located in Pike Township, the two stone structures on this site are excellent examples of 18th century German-influenced architecture. In 1706, Johannes Keim settled on the land where he first lived in a log structure which was built in 1708.. In 1978, the Historic Preservation Trust of Berks County acquired the farmstead as a gift from Mr. and Mrs. M. Richard Boyer. The Keim Farmstead is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Host Your Event – The buildings and properties maintained by the HPTBC are available for your event of gathering for more information, contact the Historic Preservation Trust of Berks County.

Current Projects

Want to know what the Trust is working on? Click here to learn about current restoration projects and fundraising efforts.